Cheapest Tax States To Reside In

Choosing to reside in a state with low tax rates can be an effective way to reduce your cost of living, often by a double digit percentage. State taxes come in a variety of forms, including income, sales, real estate, and personal property taxes. All states charge at least one of these taxes, and most charge all four to varying degrees. Your lifestyle will often dictate which type of tax is most critical for consideration when evaluating where to live. In this article, I’m going to present four states that offer different tax benefits for residents.

Alaska
Alaska has the lowest overall tax burden per resident of any state in the Union. Alaska is one of only two states that has neither a state income tax nor a state sales tax. Local municipalities in Alaska are allowed to levy their own local sales taxes, which can be as high as 7.5 percent, although many towns do not levy a sales tax. Alaskan property taxes are on par with the national average. Because of oil revenues to the state, Alaska is the only state that actually pays residents for living there. Alaska Permanent Fund Dividends vary each year, and were $878 per eligible resident in 2012.

New Hampshire
New Hampshire is the other state with no state sales tax and no state tax on ordinary income. The state does levy a tax on dividends and capital gains, so individuals who earn … Read the rest

Bankruptcy vs IRS Offer in Compromise

If you have a large amount of other debt besides just tax debt, bankruptcy may be an option you end up considering. Is this the right thing to do when you have tax liabilities?

For some people, bankruptcy can be the right way to go. While bankruptcy will not erase most tax debt, the bankruptcy court determines what you pay each creditor, and may remove some of the penalties and interest, depending on the case.

The interest rate that the IRS charges, to be honest, isn’t that bad. The rate is adjusted several times per year, and it currently sits at 4%. What kills people are actually the penalties. It is not uncommon for tax debtors to max out all their penalties, which tacks on a whopping 45.5% to their principal, and THEN interest accrues on the whole thing.

To determine whether bankruptcy is the best route for you, you should consult with a bankruptcy attorney. If all you have is IRS debt, and don’t have significant other creditors and/or don’t want the bad credit associated with bankruptcy, but you cannot otherwise go on a monthly payment plan, then consider an Offer in Compromise with the IRS. It’s a good non-bankruptcy alternative for folks that might otherwise have no other choice but to file Chapter 7, but would only be filing chapter 7 because of their IRS debt.

If you do choose to file for bankruptcy, it’s important to have … Read the rest

The Tax Shelter Over Your Head Is Still a Good Idea For 2013

Home prices, which had been on a tear, have leveled out and even fallen in places. The housing “bubble” definitely appears to be over. So, the question becomes: Is real estate still a good place for your money?

Despite uncertain real estate prices, buying a house is still a smart choice for most families. Buying, rather than renting, replaces nondeductible rent with deductible mortgage interest. You can borrow tax-free against your home’s growing equity. And you can still sell your home for up to $500,000 profit, tax-free. This particular capital gains tax break isn’t likely to disappear in 2013, despite all the rhetoric about classic tax breaks disappearing.

Mortgage Interest

Tax-deductible mortgage interest is a cornerstone of tax planning for many families. You can deduct interest on up to $1 million of “acquisition indebtedness” you use to buy or substantially improve your primary residence and one additional home. You can deduct interest on up to $1 million of construction loans for 24 months from the start of construction. (Interest before and after this period is nondeductible.) Plus, points you pay to buy or improve your primary residence are generally deductible the year you buy the home if paying points is an established practice in your area. This deduction, while discussed as one that could get the axe by Congress, is too politically sensitive to actually be taken away from American voters in 2013.

Home Equity Interest

You can deduct interest … Read the rest

8 Questions To Ask When Choosing An Accountant

The vast majority of small businesses could use the services of an accountant. The number of ways in which it is possible to introduce errors into your business through accounting practices is staggering. Your accounting includes issues related to payroll, monitoring profitability, inventory control, avoiding penalties and interest on taxes, and much, much more. It is wise to select a competent professional in this field to help you navigate the minefield of accounting pitfalls. Selecting such a professional can be difficult, especially since not all accountants are created equal.

Here are some questions to ask to help ensure that you are selecting the best accountant you can for your business.

1. Do they have any complaints with the Better Business Bureau?

When many individuals decide to take action and make a complaint against a firm, they often think first of the BBB. Check with your local division, or look them up online, and make sure that the company you are considering hiring has a good record with the BBB. If they have a Gold Star award from the BBB, then you’re on the right track to working with a company that is reputable and stands by their word. The BBB’s new letter grading system can also help you in selecting a good firm.

2. Have they ever been investigated by your state Attorney General’s office or state board of accountancy?

This is another place to do your own due diligence. … Read the rest

2013 Tax Numbers Announced, Plus 2013 Tax Planning Advice

A variety of numbers that are important for 2013 tax planning were recently released by the Internal Revenue Service and Social Security Administration.

First, let’s talk retirement accounts. In 2013, maximum 401(k) contributions from your own paycheck will be capped at $17,500 for the year, an increase of $500 over 2012. For folks 50 and older, the “catch-up” limit remains the same, at $5,500. Personal IRA contributions will be limited to $5,500 for those under 50, and $6,500 for those age 50 and older. For SIMPLE accounts, the maximum contribution increases to $12,000, with a $2,500 catch-up limit for those 50 and over.

While elimination of the Social Security taxable wage limit is one of the proposals on the table in Washington, D.C., the inflation adjusted cap for 2013 is currently slated to be $113,700, up from $110,100 for 2012. This is the maximum salary level per year per person on which Social Security taxes are charged. Your wages above that amount are not subject to that particular tax. Expect this to be a hotly debated item during the next Congressional session.

Also on the Social Security front, retirees that have not yet reached full retirement age for their birthdate can earn up to $15,120 in 2013 from employment without losing any Social Security benefits.

If you provide cash gifts to others, you’re in luck in 2013: The annual gift tax exclusion has increased to $14,000 for 2013. Do note, … Read the rest

Penalty Abatement Statements – A Humorous Example

Taxpayers have the right to request relief from penalties assessed by the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS sets very specific criteria for the granting of penalty abatements. It can be very difficult to demonstrate that a taxpayer’s circumstances meet the criteria for penalty relief. Most of the time, we will request a written statement from the taxpayer explaining the circumstances that lead to the accrual of their tax liability, and then use that to create our own penalty abatement request that fits to one of the IRS criterion, cites case law, etc.

Most of the time, taxpayer’s have some reason for not paying their taxes that ties back to not having the money to do so. Lack of funds does not meet IRS reasonable cause criteria, but the circumstances behind the lack of funds sometimes can be reasonable cause.

Occasionally, the taxpayer’s explanation for failing to pay their taxes doesn’t leave us with a lot to work with. On rare occasions, we receive an explanation that is quite humorous.

This example is from a taxpayer that elected to continue NOT paying his taxes because it was financially convenient. With a struggling business, a divorce, and alimony and child support to pay, the taxpayer was experiencing financial hardship. He wrote:

I financed [business] shortfalls with credit card advances and soon I had unsupportable credit card debts and many other expenses…

As things started to turn around for the taxpayer, he continues:… Read the rest

5 Simple Steps To Achieving Mitt Romney’s Tax Rate

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has been getting blasted for months about the fact this effective tax rate is so incredibly low. As an Enrolled Agent, I find the discussion surrounding Romney’s tax situation to be particularly interesting, because there isn’t a single taxpayer on the face of the Earth that personally wants to pay more taxes than they have to. If such a strange person does exist, there is no government that won’t happily cash your check (in fact, the U.S. government happily accepts credit cards for donations).

I’d really like to get on the phone with all these reporters and news anchors blasting Romney for his tax reduction strategies. I’d bet $100 that you can’t find one that would, themselves, personally agree to pay more taxes than they need to. Yet, they will happily ridicule somebody else for doing so.

Actually, I need to back up, because there is actually one person I know of that voluntarily pays more taxes than he’s required to. Guess who that is? Mitt Romney.

That’s right. In order to keep a campaign promise earlier this year stating that he has paid at least 13% in taxes each of the past 10 years, Mitt Romney voluntarily failed to claim $1.75 million in charitable contributions on his 2011 Form 1040. In other words, he only deducted $2.25 million of the total $4 million he actually donated to non-profits. If he had claimed … Read the rest

Where did your tax debt come from?

For the vast of taxpayers, both individuals and businesses alike, their very first tax bill stems from a series of events.

For individuals, it can be that you simply don’t pay attention to your tax situation throughout the year (hint: you should!). You think of your taxes as a once a year affair, rather than taking a proactive approach to regular tax planning. Perhaps you got a bonus, a raise, or a gambling win at some point in the year that boosted your overall income for the year into a higher tax bracket, and didn’t adjust your withholding at that time to compensate. Or perhaps you had a large debt forgiven or took money out of an IRA early, and didn’t plan for the tax consequences. Failing to take into consideration a significant life change, such as no longer being a homeowner or losing an exemption and tax credits because of a child growing too old to claim, can also have a major impact on your tax situation.

For businesses, it can start with a rough month, and simply not having the cash laying around on the 15th to make the payroll tax deposit for last month’s payroll. Essentially, it becomes a matter of convenience to skip that Federal Tax Deposit one time. Well, in my experience, that one time becomes an expedience for the entire quarter, then two quarters, with no warning or anything from the IRS. Then, suddenly … Read the rest

How the IRS views your cost of living

In general, the IRS appears to take a cynical view at people’s cost of living, and can be fairly judgmental about how we spend our money. This cynicism obviously increases dramatically the moment you have an outstanding tax debt.

Before delving into specifics, I’d like to make two points regarding the IRS personnel you’d normally be discussing your personal finances with. First, IRS field personnel such as Revenue Officers and Settlement (Appeals) Officers typically have higher salaries than the IRS National Standards for the areas in which they are assigned. In other words, even as public servants, they make more money than their own standards set for a middle class lifestyle.

Second, keep in mind that these people are public servants. In fact, most senior IRS personnel are lifetime bureaucrats, meaning that they have never had to work in the private sector. Some senior Revenue Officers, Revenue Agents (Auditors), and Settlement Officers have actually never worked a day in their lives outside of the government, and don’t even have finance or accounting backgrounds.

Combining these two things, you can see that it’s very possible that the IRS person you are explaining your finances to has an interesting view on the world: They’ve always made an above average salary, and lack any personal experience running a business or dealing with the reality of private sector employment. This skewed perspective becomes readily apparent in talking to senior IRS personnel if you’re a … Read the rest

Attention Truckers: Don’t forget to file Form 2290 this week

If you are a tractor-trailer operator or run other heavy highway equipment, you are probably already familiar with IRS Form 2290 and the payment of heavy vehicle highway use taxes. In general, this return is due on August 31st, along with payment for your vehicles that are taxed as heavy vehicls.

The deadline generally applies to Form 2290 and the accompanying tax payment for the tax year that begins on July 1, 2012, and ends on June 30, 2013. Returns must be filed and tax payments made by Aug. 31 for vehicles used on the road during July. If you put a new vehicle into service after July 2012, you will need to file another return and pay the tax on that vehicle by the end of next month after placing the vehicle in service. So, if you put a new rig into service in November, the return and the tax are both due on December 31.

The highway use tax applies to highway motor vehicles with a taxable gross weight of 55,000 pounds or more, which generally includes trucks, truck tractors, and buses. Ordinarily, vans, pick-ups, and panel trucks are not taxable because they fall below the 55,000-pound threshold. The tax of up to $550 per vehicle is based on weight, and a variety of special rules apply, which are explained in the instructions to Form 2290.

If you have not yet filed and paid these particular taxes, they … Read the rest