Categories
Tax Credits Tax Returns

Federal Economic Impact Payments – Frequently Asked Questions

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Congress recently passed legislation authorizing stimulus payments to most Americans. These payments, called Economic Impact Payments, are being processed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) at the current time. Many people have questions about these payments, so this FAQ has been assembled to help you find answers.

Is the Economic Impact Payment considered to be taxable income?

No, this payment is not considered “income” by the IRS and you will not need to pay income tax on it. This payment will not effect your refund, or increase the amount you owe when you file your 2020 tax return in 2021. This stimulus payment will also have no impact on your eligibility for other federal assistance programs that use income to determine eligibility.

How can people who receive a Form SSA-1099 or RRB-1099 check their payment status?

Taxpayers can use the IRS Get My Payment tool to check on the status of their stimulus payment. This will require you to verify your identity by answering a set of security questions.

If my bank account information has changed since the last time I filed a tax return, how do I update my direct deposit information?

The Get My Payment tool at irs.gov does not allow you to change your direct deposit information. This is a security precaution to prevent these payments from being stolen by changing this information.

If the IRS sends your payment using the bank direct deposit information from your most recent tax return and the bank account information is now invalid, the bank will notify the IRS and reject the electronic transfer. The IRS will then mail you a check as soon as they are able, to your last known address. The Get My Payment tool will then be updated to reflect the date on which this check was mailed. Please note that the IRS says it may take up to 14 days to receive the payment after it’s been mailed.

Where can I get more information?

If you are required to file a tax return, you are encouraged to file electronically. You can find a tax professional in your area by searching our directory of tax firms.

If you are not required to file a tax return, you may use the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here tool and submit your information to the IRS to receive an Economic Impact Payment. This online tool should only be used by individuals that have no requirement to file a tax return. Do not use this tool to attempt to update your direct deposit information if it’s now outdated. Instead, use the procedure in the previous question.

Categories
Taxpayer Representation

The Simple Truth About IRS Offer in Compromise Fees

Most tax resolution companies give you a quote for services based primarily on three things:

  1. How much you owe the IRS
  2. What kind of taxes you owe
  3. How much the sales person thinks you can afford to pay THEM

Here’s a dirty little secret of the tax resolution industry that nobody else will tell you: The actual WORK required to resolve a case has very, very little to do with how much you owe or what kind of tax it is, and obviously nothing to do with how much of a fee you can pay for representation.

What makes a tax resolution case more complex has much, much more to do with other factors, such as:

  • the existence of other creditors
  • the status of your assets
  • whether or not there are existing levies or wage garnishments
  • how long you’ve been accruing a tax liability
  • your past efforts (or lack thereof) to resolve the issue
  • your ability to file missing returns quickly
  • whether or not your accounting is up to date
  • whether or not you are able to “stop the bleeding” and become current with present day filing and payment requirements (this is actually the single biggest factor)

Most companies have a minimum fee quote for doing an Offer in Compromise for you, and it’s generally higher than for doing a payment plan, because the OIC process takes 6 to 12 months from start to finish. Most reputable firms will charge you anywhere from $3500 to $5000 for doing a basic Offer in Compromise for you, and this may or may not include filing appeals and dealing with levies, and most definitely does not include filing any tax returns for you.

Here’s the thing, though: Filing an Offer in Compromise is actually pretty simple, and the size of your tax debt and the tax type does NOT make it any more difficult. It’s the same form, the same financial analysis, whether you owe $14,000 in personal income taxes or you owe $4.5 million in unpaid employment taxes. Big surprise: The detailed financial analysis required for the business with the payroll tax debt isn’t that much more involved than the smaller personal tax liability, assuming you have proper financial records for the business.

Instead of getting a fee quote based mainly on how much you owe and what a salesperson gets a “vibe” that you can afford to pay, make sure you get a firm fee quote from reputable firms, such as those that you’ll find in our directory.